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Waterfront spectacular

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Title: Waterfront spectacular
Author(s): Hochhalter, Anna
Advisor(s): Hays, David L.
Department / Program: Landscape Architecture
Discipline: Landscape Architecture
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: M.L.A.
Genre: Thesis
Subject(s): post-industrial waterfront riverfront spectacle productive landscape service economy parks Detroit Chicago New York City New Orleans
Abstract: Through discourse analysis and site evaluation, this thesis asks two questions: first, what is the potential of the contemporary urban waterfront to structure and perpetuate meaningful spectacle; and second, what is the potential for spectacle to restructure the post-industrial public waterfront thus affording these sites more transformative power within society? Discourse analysis of spectacle is used in order to establish a typology of spectacle as well as a new definition of the phenomenon. Three case study cities—New Orleans, New York City, and Chicago—are evaluated in order to understand contemporary design strategies in post-industrial public waterfront projects. Spectacle is newly defined by the author as, “a visible deviation from the norm intended to provoke a response.” That understanding of spectacle is then explored as a design strategy on a riverfront site in downtown Detroit, Michigan, as part of the Detroit by Design 2012 Detroit Riverfront Competition. The author proposes a concept called “CityWorks Plaza & Port: a Publicly Owned Working Wharf and Repurposing Cooperative” as a model for Detroit. CityWorks Plaza and Port capitalizes on two detrimental aquatic invasive species: the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) and zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and asserts that making work visible, in public, is spectacular—as noted, “a visible deviation from the norm intended to provoke a response.” In conclusion, this thesis discusses how instrumentalizing spectacle in design can lead to a post-post-industrial scenario—one which merges industrial space with public space, thus enabling a more diverse and generative economy while meeting public demands for waterfront access and recreational space.
Issue Date: 2013-05-24
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/44194
Rights Information: Copyright 2013 Anna L. Hochhalter
Date Available in IDEALS: 2013-05-24
Date Deposited: 2013-05
 

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