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Advanced stamp geometries and adhesiveless transfer printing modalities for use in deterministic materials assembly

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Title: Advanced stamp geometries and adhesiveless transfer printing modalities for use in deterministic materials assembly
Author(s): Carlson, Andrew
Director of Research: Rogers, John A.
Doctoral Committee Chair(s): Rogers, John A.
Doctoral Committee Member(s): Braun, Paul V.; Sottos, Nancy R.; Ferreira, Placid M.
Department / Program: Materials Science & Engineerng
Discipline: Materials Science & Engr
Degree Granting Institution: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Degree: Ph.D.
Genre: Dissertation
Subject(s): Transfer Print Flexible Electronics Synthetic Adhesives Rate-Dependent Adhesion, Biomimetic Adhesives
Abstract: Transfer printing has become a robust technique for assembling disparate classes of micro-and nanomaterials into spatially organized, functional arrangements in two and three-dimensional layouts. Such capabilities have made this assembly process invaluable in realizing novel or unusual forms of many high-performance systems, such as flexible electronics, three-dimensional optoelectronics, and bio-compatible or bio-integrated electronic devices. The focus of this thesis is to develop a collection of advanced transfer printing modalities that enable expansion in breadth and diversity of materials and formats that serve as either ink or substrate layers during assembly. Targeted modulation of adhesion at the stamp/nanomaterial interface provides a direct route for enhancing printing efficacy, particularly in ‘dry’ or adhesiveless systems where intimate contact between the substrate and transferred material is desired. This body of work progresses from several simple, passive techniques that demonstrate either strong or weak levels of stamp adhesion for retrieval and printing, respectively, to more active methods that utilize first dynamic adhesion switching and then ultimately fine control over stamp adhesive strength through the use of targeted mechanical loading. Several examples of assembled devices are discussed to demonstrate the broad utility of these protocols, as well as integration strategies for high throughput, massively parallel printing paradigms.
Issue Date: 2012-05-22
URI: http://hdl.handle.net/2142/31085
Rights Information: Copyright 2012 Andrew Carlson
Date Available in IDEALS: 2012-05-22
Date Deposited: 2012-05
 

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